Category Archives: Development

Sound Transit releases the RFP for Capitol Hill Light Rail properties

Sound Transit released the Request for Proposals (RFP) yesterday. Inexplicably buried within a “closed” document (perhaps for the RFQ), the proposal lists the requirements for each property. Here are the general documents:

  1.  RP 0010-14 Capitol Hill TOD Request For Proposals
  2. RP 0010-14 Housing Tool All Sites
  3. Attachment B Sound Transit Timeline
  4. Attachment D Technical Documents

Here are Exhibit A Reference Documents

  1. Urban Design Framework
  2. Urban Design Framework cover letter
  3. Sound Transit Tunnel Easements
  4. Development Agreement and Coordinated Development Plan
  5. LBA-Capitol Hill Station Survey

Here are the lot specific documents:

  1. SITE C – Retail Approach
  2. SITE C – Parking Approach
  3. SITE C – Housing Approach
  4. SITE C – Green Factor and Sustainability Approach
  5. SITE C – Development Program
  6. SITE C – Community Center Approach
  7. SITE C – Amenity Areas
  8. SITE B SOUTH – Parking Approach
  9. SITE B SOUTH – Housing Approach
  10. SITE B SOUTH – Green Factor and Sustainability Approac
  11. SITE B SOUTH – Development Program
  12. SITE B SOUTH – Amenity Areas
  13. SITE B NORTH – Parking Approach
  14. SITE B NORTH – Housing Approach
  15. SITE B NORTH – Green Factor and Sustainability Approac
  16. SITE B NORTH – Development Program
  17. SITE B NORTH – Community Center Approach
  18. SITE B NORTH – Amenity Areas
  19. SITE A – Retail Approach SITE A – Parking Approach
  20. SITE A – Housing Approach
  21. SITE A – Green Factor and Sustainability Approach
  22. SITE A – Development Program Scoring
  23. SITE A – Community Center Approach
  24. SITE A – Amenity Areas

 

 

Seattle in Top Ten of Top 30 Largest U.S. Metros for Walkable Urbanism

From Builder:

Walkable real estate development projects and places are on the rise nationwide, but certain metro regions are progressing faster than others, according to a new report.

“Foot Traffic Ahead: Ranking Walkable Urbanism in America’s Largest Metros” ranks the country’s top 30 metropolitan areas based on the amount of commercial development in Walkable Urban Places (WalkUPs). While metro areas like Washington, D.C., New York, Boston, the San Francisco Bay Area, and Chicago ranked among the top current areas for walkable urbanism, the report found that other cities—including Miami, Atlanta, and Detroit—are well positioned for future growth of walkability given current efforts in those the communities. The study is a project of the Center for Real Estate and Urban Analysis at George Washington University School of Business in conjunction with LOCUS: Responsible Real Estate Developers and Investors, a program of Smart Growth America.

Walkups

“These places are witnessing the end of sprawl,” says Christopher Leinberger, president of LOCUS and one of the study’s authors. “It represents a pretty significant change in how we invest and build the country.”

The study, which noted higher education levels and one-third higher GDP per capita in high-ranking cities, underlines the economic power of walkable places and identifies which metro areas are adding them fastest. These spaces are home to 46% of the U.S. population and account for 58% of the country’s total GDP, Leinberger notes.

“As economic engines, as talent attractors, and as highly productive real estate, these WalkUPs are a crucial component in building and sustaining a thriving urban economy,” he says. “Cities with more WalkUPs are positioned for success, now and in the future.”

The trend toward walkable and transit-oriented living is here to stay, the study’s authors conclude: “This is not just a passing fad,” Leinberger says. “It’s going to take 20 to 30 years for cities to catch up with the demand for walkable spaces.”

The newly released “Foot Traffic Ahead” report finds that areas found to have high levels of walkability are models for the future development patterns of many of the largest 30 U.S. metropolitan areas. The study breaks down the top 30 metros into 4 levels: high, moderate, tentative, and low walkable urbanism.

Screen Shot 2014-06-16 at 11.29.39 PM

 Other key findings of the study include:

—There are 558 WalkUPs, or regionally significant walkable urban places, in the 30 largest metro areas in the U.S.

—Walkable urban office space in the 30 largest metros commands a 74% rent-per-square-foot premium over rents in drivable suburban areas. These price premiums continue to grow.

—Walkable urban development is not limited to the revitalization of center cities; it also is the urbanization of the suburbs.

Click here for the full list of rankings and to download the report.

Learn more about markets featured in this article: Boston, MACleveland, OHDetroit, MI,Houston, TXSan Diego, CASan Francisco, CAWashington, DCAtlanta, GA.

For the original article

8 developers chosen to submit bids for Cap Hill station developments

CHS reported this morning that

Sound Transit has selected eight firms to submit bids to develop four housing and retail properties that will surround the future Capitol Hill light rail station.

The shortlisted firms will also sit down with the Capitol Hill Championgroup at a June 2nd public meeting to make sure they understand and adopt the community priorities forged over several years.

Read who made it and more here.

 

Ten Cities Where the Most People Walk to Work

According to 247wallst.com, Seattle rates number 7 in cities where people walked to work. Of course, Capitol Hill plays a large part of this, despite the proliferation of residential building in Belltown and South Lake Union.

Just 2.9% of American workers walked to work as of 2012, according to data recently released by the U.S. Census Bureau. However, the Census Bureau notes that there were massive regional differences in the proportion of people who chose to walk to a work. Different factors influence commuters’ preferences, including a city’s layout, climate, and infrastructure.

Boston residents were the most likely Americans to walk to work, with 15.1% doing so as of 2012. By comparison, less than 1% of workers in Gilbert, Arizona and Plano, Texas commuted on foot. Based on U.S. Census Bureau figures, these are the cities with the highest percentage of commuters walking to work.

While commuters choose walking for various reasons — ranging from lack of resources to simply residing near their place of business — many of the cities reviewed were also pleasant places to walk. The publicly accessible walkability index generated by Walk Score gave seven of the 10 cities a score of at least 70, a rating described as “very walkable,” as measured by residents’ proximity to amenities as well as friendliness to pedestrians. New York City, where more than 10% of residents walked to work, had a walk score of 87.6, the highest in the nation

High population densities also tended to encourage walking. For example, the New York City metropolitan area was the densest metro area nationwide, with 31,683 people per square mile in 2010. The area included two of the cities where a high proportion of commuters walked to work, New York City and Jersey City. Five other cities on this list were among the country’s 10 most densely-populated metro areas.

A walkable city also tends to support public transit and bike infrastructure. The cities where people walked most to work also had among the nation’s top five transit systems, as measured by Walk Score. These include New York, San Francisco, Boston, Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia, which all have well-developed and heavily used public transportation systems. On an average weekday, the New York area’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority has a dailyridership of more than 8.5 million people.

Cities where people walk to work are also often ideal destinations for residents who enjoy riding bikes. Five of these cities were among the 10 best large cities for the quality of biking. Most notably, San Francisco was the third best such city, with a bike score of 70, according to Walk Score. In fact, some of these cities not only had a high proportion of workers who walked to work, but also a substantial proportion of commuters who biked. In Madison, Wisconsin, more than 5% of workers commuted by bicycle, the second-most of any major city.

Of course, with walking a viable option for a large number of workers in these cities — in many cases supplemented by biking and public transit — relatively few households elected to own cars. As of 2012, just 9.2% of households nationwide did not have a car. In New York, that number was greater than 56%, the highest in the U.S. At least a third of households did not own a vehicle in half of the cities where people were most likely to commute by walking.

Many cities promote walking as a way to get-around due to the various health benefits associated with regular, brisk walking. According to the American Heart Association, walking half an hour a day reduces the risk of heart disease, osteoporosis, and stroke, while helping people improve their blood pressure and lower their body weight.

Based on recently released U.S Census Bureau figures, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the cities with the most workers walking to work between 2008 and 2012. Walk Score produced the figures on the quality of walking, biking and public transit. Data on population-weighted density and the percent of households without a vehicle are based on the 2010 Census and 2012 American Community Survey (ACS), respectively. We used the 2012 ACS for population data.

 

…..

7. Seattle, Wash.
> Pct. walking to work: 9.1% (tied for 6th)
> Walk score: 70.8 (10th highest)
> Pct. households with no car: 16.7% (23rd highest)
> Population density (of metro area): 4,721.6 (24th highest)

Seattle had the ninth best public transit score among all cities, according to Walk Score, which also ranked the city 10th for walkability, and 11th for bike friendliness. As a result, many residents chose to avoid driving to work. More than 9% commuted to work on foot and another 3.4% by bike, both among the highest proportions in the country. According to the Seattle Department of Transportation, the city’s long-term goal is to become the nation’s most walkable city. Although the Seattle metro area is more densely populated than most cities, the population is still relatively widely dispersed in comparison to New York, Boston, San Francisco, and other large cities of similar size.

 

Read more: Ten Cities Where the Most People Walk to Work – 24/7 Wall St. http://247wallst.com/special-report/2014/05/16/ten-cities-where-the-most-people-walk-to-work/#ixzz32BUEpEf3

 

 

 

Development on Capitol Hill

In anticipation of our development-focused General Meeting on 5/22/14, here are a few pictures of some of the latest buildings being erected, as well as some buildings that have had neighbors complaining.