Category Archives: Planning

Capitol Hill Community Council

Build. Strong. Communities

September 21st 6:30 – 7:30 PM, 12th Ave Arts

Strengthen community and increasing engagement is the Capitol Hill Community Council’s mission! We will be introducing new officers, receive updates from the city and others in the community.

In addition, since it will be National Voters Registration Day we will be providing documents for people to get registered to vote. This is a crucial year of voting and we want to ensure that our community’s voice is heard. ***preparing for our Ballot party in October*** :)

Hilloween is Saturday, October 28th!
October 28, 12-3pm, Carnival at Mitchell Activity Center (1718 Broadway)
Trick or Treat on Broadway, Pike & Pine from 3-6pm
The Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce’s  8th annual Hilloween event is a one-day community celebration on Broadway and in the Pike-Pine corridor.  The indoor kid’s carnival returns this year with a fun Circus theme featuring live performances, carnival games and age-appropriate activities. The carnival concludes with a costume parade led by a marching band and Trick or Treating on Broadway, Pike and Pine.  This family – friendly community party is FREE and open to everyone!

+PLUS! Updates from the Capitol Hill Champion!

 

 

Seattle in Top Ten of Top 30 Largest U.S. Metros for Walkable Urbanism

From Builder:

Walkable real estate development projects and places are on the rise nationwide, but certain metro regions are progressing faster than others, according to a new report.

“Foot Traffic Ahead: Ranking Walkable Urbanism in America’s Largest Metros” ranks the country’s top 30 metropolitan areas based on the amount of commercial development in Walkable Urban Places (WalkUPs). While metro areas like Washington, D.C., New York, Boston, the San Francisco Bay Area, and Chicago ranked among the top current areas for walkable urbanism, the report found that other cities—including Miami, Atlanta, and Detroit—are well positioned for future growth of walkability given current efforts in those the communities. The study is a project of the Center for Real Estate and Urban Analysis at George Washington University School of Business in conjunction with LOCUS: Responsible Real Estate Developers and Investors, a program of Smart Growth America.

Walkups

“These places are witnessing the end of sprawl,” says Christopher Leinberger, president of LOCUS and one of the study’s authors. “It represents a pretty significant change in how we invest and build the country.”

The study, which noted higher education levels and one-third higher GDP per capita in high-ranking cities, underlines the economic power of walkable places and identifies which metro areas are adding them fastest. These spaces are home to 46% of the U.S. population and account for 58% of the country’s total GDP, Leinberger notes.

“As economic engines, as talent attractors, and as highly productive real estate, these WalkUPs are a crucial component in building and sustaining a thriving urban economy,” he says. “Cities with more WalkUPs are positioned for success, now and in the future.”

The trend toward walkable and transit-oriented living is here to stay, the study’s authors conclude: “This is not just a passing fad,” Leinberger says. “It’s going to take 20 to 30 years for cities to catch up with the demand for walkable spaces.”

The newly released “Foot Traffic Ahead” report finds that areas found to have high levels of walkability are models for the future development patterns of many of the largest 30 U.S. metropolitan areas. The study breaks down the top 30 metros into 4 levels: high, moderate, tentative, and low walkable urbanism.

Screen Shot 2014-06-16 at 11.29.39 PM

 Other key findings of the study include:

—There are 558 WalkUPs, or regionally significant walkable urban places, in the 30 largest metro areas in the U.S.

—Walkable urban office space in the 30 largest metros commands a 74% rent-per-square-foot premium over rents in drivable suburban areas. These price premiums continue to grow.

—Walkable urban development is not limited to the revitalization of center cities; it also is the urbanization of the suburbs.

Click here for the full list of rankings and to download the report.

Learn more about markets featured in this article: Boston, MACleveland, OHDetroit, MI,Houston, TXSan Diego, CASan Francisco, CAWashington, DCAtlanta, GA.

For the original article

2014-15 Executive Committee candidates

Below are the candidates for the 2014-2015 Executive Committee. Elections will be 6/19 at the Cal Anderson Shelter House at 6:30.

George Bakan – for President

For 26 years George Bakan has been the Editor-in-Chief for Seattle Gay News. He has been overseeing the operation of the SGN weekly newspaper since 1983. George was born in Seattle, raised in rural Bellevue and in the 1960s he moved with his family to Eastern Washington. George returned to Seattle in the early 1980s to become a gay activist. Some of the highlights of his almost 30-years of gay community activism are organizing the Seattle AIDS Action Committee in 1983, which later became Mobilization Against AIDS. During the early days of the AIDS epidemic George and the Seattle AIDS Action Committee organized an annual candle light vigil at SCCC at Pine and Broadway on Capitol Hill. During his early days as an activist he co-chaired the 1984 Freedom Day Committee, now known as Seattle Out and Proud. George was the regional co-chair for the 1987 and 1993 National Marches on Washington, DC. During both organizing efforts Bakan led the Northwest sponsored push for bi and transsexual inclusion at the national events. He was on the Hands Off Washington (HOW) Executive Committee and was for a time Vice Chair for Hands Off Washington. HOW worked statewide on LGBT political issues from 1992 to 1996. Thought of retirement does not suit George. The LGBT veteran activist continues his daily oversight at the SGN and looks towards future projects, including health issues for old gay guys and setting up training and leadership workshops for young LGBT activists and a tree planting project in Seattle parks to honor people who’ve died of AIDS.

Zachary Pullin – for Vice President

Is an enrolled member of the Chippewa Cree Tribe of Rocky Boy, Montana and a former Peace Corps volunteer in Belize, he finds passion in service and illuminating how our myriad identities weave together. Currently the Communications Coordinator for the Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship, he also works with Gay City hosting community conversation events for the LGBTQ community. He is currently an at-large member of the Capitol Hill Community Council, a member of the Gender Justice League, Northwest Two Spirits Society, the Native American Advisory Council with the SPD, and Seattle Neighborhood Greenways. Zachary has also spoken about social justice, inclusion, access, intersectionality, and community at universities across the country from Emory in Atlanta to Mills College in San Francisco, and is a freelance writer in notable publications such as The Advocate, Native Peoples, and Indian Country Today. His greatest accomplishment is bringing neighbors together for forums and summits to address intersectionality and community building.
I am interested in the Vice President role because I value that the Capitol Hill Community Council is for more than social justice, equity, and neighborhood livability. The CHCC is for authentic community; and, I would love to add to that mission. With experience in communications, digital media, marketing, sustainable development, nonviolent resistance, and community organizing, I know I will provide valuable experience and perspective to an already talented council. Refreshing our website and email management are my first goals as I hope to increase Capitol Hill resident participation at meetings and at various neighborhood events.
As a former Peace Corps volunteer, my inclination to serve is inherent in how I approach social justice and advocacy. As a young gay, Native American living on the Hill and organizing with various local community groups, I can add a fresh voice on the issues that matter to those who live, work, and organize on Capitol Hill. My interests are in affordable housing, neighborhood density, safety, the arts, and culture. I intend to represent the interests of renters, metro users, and marginalized groups with little to no access.

Mike Archambault – for Treasurer

I have have been living in Capitol Hill for that last 7 years, and I currently rent a 1 bedroom apartment with my partner in a beautiful, old (built in 1909!), brick building on Summit.

Over the years, I have worked with CHCC and community members to help make our neighborhood a safer place to walk, bike, and take transit. I’m proud to have been involved in past Community Council efforts such as the Complete Streetcar Campaign and the 12th Ave Safety Improvement Project, two fruitful projects that were made possible only through the strong community support and with the help of CHCC.
I currently see high housing costs as the most immediate crisis facing our neighborhood. I have witnessed too many friends and neighbors get pushed out of Capitol Hill to escape the quickly rising rents. If we want any chance at retaining the current fabric of residents and buildings that make Capitol Hill so special today, we need to work hard to make room for the inundation of new residents.
I’m thrilled by the opportunity to work as Treasurer for the Community Council. My strong math and engineering background make me well equipped to keep track of CHCC’s finances, and I’m excited to help the council find solutions that make Capitol Hill’s streets safer and its housing more affordable.

Elliot Helmbrecht – for Secretary

Is a Minnesota native and is approaching his 10-year anniversary of living in Seattle this fall. Four years ago, Elliot moved to Capitol Hill into an early-1900’s, brick building and in 2012 he and his girlfriend began co-managing the 29-unit apartment. During their two years of managing the building they have tried to foster a sense of community among the tenants by hosting events for neighbors to meet each other and socialize. Currently, Elliot works for Northwest Passage Consulting in Seattle. He previously worked for Capitol Hill Housing, an affordable housing developer and provider. One of his greatest accomplishments working with Capitol Hill Housing was his participation on a workgroup to assess and reduce barriers to housing for low-income neighbors in our community.
I am running for the Secretary position with the Capitol Hill Community Council to improve our online presence and meeting notices to encourage broader participation among Capitol Hill’s residents. We can expand our media relations to cover our meetings and issues we care about. I believe the Capitol Hill Community Council has shown evidence of being successful at neighborhood advocacy in the past. The potential to do even more is possible with an engaged and dedicated group of leaders and members.

Erie Jones – for Member at Large

I have lived, and also worked on the hill for 35 years and counting. In my view it is one of the best urban neighborhoods in the country. Simply stated, I would like to contribute to keeping it one of the best. This would include maintaining our diversity and tolerance for all, promoting affordable living, keeping local businesses healthy, creatively managing growth and development, preserving our cultural and architectural heritage, and especially maintaining our neighborhood feeling of mutual support. I have taught in Seattle Public Schools for 23 years, including at Lowell Elementary where I helped get the grants for our accessible playscape. I helped plan and build the Thomas Street P-Patch and am active in our neighborhood block watch. I have also helped, financially and through work, set up small businesses on the hill. I am a musician and currently teach music at Dusty Strings in Fremont.

Derek DeWolf – for Member at Large

I am a Seattle native. After graduating High School, I attended Arizona State University, graduating with a degree in International Business and Political Science. I served as an intern in the Senate during college assisting some of Arizona’s most prominent political leaders. After graduation I moved to Portland for a job with Nordstrom where I gained a better understanding of community, service, and consumer relations. Portland is a great city but never felt like home, which is why I moved back to Seattle. I currently live and work on Capitol Hill, the neighborhood I call home. I am fortunate to be a Real Estate Broker for Coldwell Banker Bain and primarily conduct my business serving the Capitol Hill community.

I am dedicated to serving on the Capitol Hill Community Council because I feel an abundance of community only found on Capitol Hill. The hill provides more than an address for me; it shapes the individual I am growing into. Capitol Hill teaches me about diversity, acceptance, understanding, passion, and most important, love every day. In my line of work and at a youthful age of 26, I am able to bridge a gap between different types of neighbors. Whether it be a renter living in an early 1900’s walk-up building starting their future, or a family who has been part of this community for decades dwelling in a large North Capitol Hill Craftsman. I sympathize with the young professionals who struggle financially while also sharing concern for the future of our community. My daily interactions provide me a path for communication. I recognize the history of leadership, activism, and perseverance it took to make a difference here, which is what I hope to do.

I am running for member-at-large position and will utilize my passion, experience with community, and deep-rooted commitment to making Capitol Hill a better place for my friends, my neighbors, and one day, my family in this role.

Thank you for considering my interest in this role.

 

8 developers chosen to submit bids for Cap Hill station developments

CHS reported this morning that

Sound Transit has selected eight firms to submit bids to develop four housing and retail properties that will surround the future Capitol Hill light rail station.

The shortlisted firms will also sit down with the Capitol Hill Championgroup at a June 2nd public meeting to make sure they understand and adopt the community priorities forged over several years.

Read who made it and more here.

 

Ten Cities Where the Most People Walk to Work

According to 247wallst.com, Seattle rates number 7 in cities where people walked to work. Of course, Capitol Hill plays a large part of this, despite the proliferation of residential building in Belltown and South Lake Union.

Just 2.9% of American workers walked to work as of 2012, according to data recently released by the U.S. Census Bureau. However, the Census Bureau notes that there were massive regional differences in the proportion of people who chose to walk to a work. Different factors influence commuters’ preferences, including a city’s layout, climate, and infrastructure.

Boston residents were the most likely Americans to walk to work, with 15.1% doing so as of 2012. By comparison, less than 1% of workers in Gilbert, Arizona and Plano, Texas commuted on foot. Based on U.S. Census Bureau figures, these are the cities with the highest percentage of commuters walking to work.

While commuters choose walking for various reasons — ranging from lack of resources to simply residing near their place of business — many of the cities reviewed were also pleasant places to walk. The publicly accessible walkability index generated by Walk Score gave seven of the 10 cities a score of at least 70, a rating described as “very walkable,” as measured by residents’ proximity to amenities as well as friendliness to pedestrians. New York City, where more than 10% of residents walked to work, had a walk score of 87.6, the highest in the nation

High population densities also tended to encourage walking. For example, the New York City metropolitan area was the densest metro area nationwide, with 31,683 people per square mile in 2010. The area included two of the cities where a high proportion of commuters walked to work, New York City and Jersey City. Five other cities on this list were among the country’s 10 most densely-populated metro areas.

A walkable city also tends to support public transit and bike infrastructure. The cities where people walked most to work also had among the nation’s top five transit systems, as measured by Walk Score. These include New York, San Francisco, Boston, Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia, which all have well-developed and heavily used public transportation systems. On an average weekday, the New York area’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority has a dailyridership of more than 8.5 million people.

Cities where people walk to work are also often ideal destinations for residents who enjoy riding bikes. Five of these cities were among the 10 best large cities for the quality of biking. Most notably, San Francisco was the third best such city, with a bike score of 70, according to Walk Score. In fact, some of these cities not only had a high proportion of workers who walked to work, but also a substantial proportion of commuters who biked. In Madison, Wisconsin, more than 5% of workers commuted by bicycle, the second-most of any major city.

Of course, with walking a viable option for a large number of workers in these cities — in many cases supplemented by biking and public transit — relatively few households elected to own cars. As of 2012, just 9.2% of households nationwide did not have a car. In New York, that number was greater than 56%, the highest in the U.S. At least a third of households did not own a vehicle in half of the cities where people were most likely to commute by walking.

Many cities promote walking as a way to get-around due to the various health benefits associated with regular, brisk walking. According to the American Heart Association, walking half an hour a day reduces the risk of heart disease, osteoporosis, and stroke, while helping people improve their blood pressure and lower their body weight.

Based on recently released U.S Census Bureau figures, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the cities with the most workers walking to work between 2008 and 2012. Walk Score produced the figures on the quality of walking, biking and public transit. Data on population-weighted density and the percent of households without a vehicle are based on the 2010 Census and 2012 American Community Survey (ACS), respectively. We used the 2012 ACS for population data.

 

…..

7. Seattle, Wash.
> Pct. walking to work: 9.1% (tied for 6th)
> Walk score: 70.8 (10th highest)
> Pct. households with no car: 16.7% (23rd highest)
> Population density (of metro area): 4,721.6 (24th highest)

Seattle had the ninth best public transit score among all cities, according to Walk Score, which also ranked the city 10th for walkability, and 11th for bike friendliness. As a result, many residents chose to avoid driving to work. More than 9% commuted to work on foot and another 3.4% by bike, both among the highest proportions in the country. According to the Seattle Department of Transportation, the city’s long-term goal is to become the nation’s most walkable city. Although the Seattle metro area is more densely populated than most cities, the population is still relatively widely dispersed in comparison to New York, Boston, San Francisco, and other large cities of similar size.

 

Read more: Ten Cities Where the Most People Walk to Work – 24/7 Wall St. http://247wallst.com/special-report/2014/05/16/ten-cities-where-the-most-people-walk-to-work/#ixzz32BUEpEf3

 

 

 

Development on Capitol Hill

In anticipation of our development-focused General Meeting on 5/22/14, here are a few pictures of some of the latest buildings being erected, as well as some buildings that have had neighbors complaining.

General Meeting 5/22/14, 6:30; focus on Development

Agenda
Capitol Hill Community Council
General Meeting
Cal Anderson Shelterhouse
May 22, 2014, 6:30

Updates
6:30 Welcome and announcements:
Elections
CAPA yard sale

6:35 CH Champion update John Akamatsu and Cathy Hillenbrand 5 min
Upcoming June community meeting
6:40 Streetcar Extension Update (Emily Mannetti) 10 min Where the project stands, upcoming open house, and opening dialogue with community
6:50 Committee Report:
· Safety Summary

7:00 By-laws: John and Erie 10 disc (to be discussed one more time in June, and voted on during the July meeting).
· Resolution

· Revising quorum
7:10 City Light and City Construction Hub team 25 min

7:35 Mike Podowski, DPD 40 min
· update on zoning heights and microhousing legislation

8:10 Brady Walkinshaw, Representative of 43rd Legislative District 10 minutes

8:30 Adjourn

—-
John Akamatsu, Vice President

March Minutes 2014

The March 20, 2014 General meeting took place at the Cal Anderson Park Shelter House at 6:30 PM. 

Announcements:
Tim Durkan from the city announced that there are three finalists out of 10 projects submitted for the neighborhood grants project. The final winning project for our district will receive $90,000. The three finalists are 1) sidewalk repairs along Madison, 2) Crosswalk improvements on Madison  3) Improvements to the intersection at 23rd and Boyer. See our website for more information.
The Sustainable Capitol Hill organization is looking for unharvested fruit trees they can help harvest this summer and fall. The food will be taken to local food banks. To help or to offer your trees for gleaning, contact pshazz@gmail.com
The Transit Coalition announces that Prop. 1 will be on the ballot April 22nd and will restore funding to local Metro tranist. To learn more about this propostion see www.movekingcountynow.org  The measure will raise $130 million per year for both road maintenance and tranist needs.
The Capitol Hill Champion will hold a public meeting in early June to bring the qualifying developers and the community to discuss the light rail station. Volunteers are needed for this meeting. The Cap Hill Community Council will vote in April as to whether or not we will help support this meeting with a donation of $200 that would be used to purchase food from the Farmers Market for the reception.

Elections:
We have an opening for a Treasurer and that position could be filled at any time in the coming months or at the general election in July.
Zachary Pullin was elected as our new Member at Large by a unanimous vote of the membership present.

Updates:
The Stunning Seattle Murals project has been reborn, free of legal snares, and is now called The Seattle Murals Project. We had pledged $200 to this project last year when it was Stunning Seattle Murals but did not give the funds due to the various legal troubles it was having. At this meeting we voted to honor our $200 pledge to this project, which will bring 5 new murals to various Capitol Hill locations.  More info at www.seattlemuralproject.org

Presentations:
Don Harper and Carol Fisher from the Save our Parks group came to speak against the city’s proposed Metroplitan Parks District. It is possible that this topic will be on our voter ballots in August, put there by the city. www.OurParksForever.com

The Mayor has recently sent out this information the parks district initiative:
“What’s a park district? Who will govern the park district? Who will provide oversight on how Parks spends taxpayer dollars? Those questions and more are answered in the FAQ onour Seattle Parks Legacy Funding webpage.  “
Bylaws:
Amended by laws for the following articles. Changes in bold.

Article IV: final line–

“These boundaries are inclusive of both sides of any street listed as a boundary”

Article V:
“A meeting schedule for the CHCC shall be established by the current CHCC Elected Officers. The Secretary shall take steps to ensure that the community receives notices of forthcoming meetings. Meeting dates will be listed at least once in community-based media such as Capitol Hill Seattle Blog, The Capitol Hill times, Facebook and Twitter, posted electronically via email, the CHCC blog, and posted in public places as applicable such as the Capitol Hill Branch of the Seattle Public Library and local print media if available at no charge.”

Article V sec. 8:

“To ensure that Council meetings run smoothly, items for the next meeting should be received by any member of the Executive Committee by the first Monday of the month.”
Strike last line: Agenda cannot be altered once the meeting has commenced.

Meeting adjourned

Three projects considered for neighborhood funds

From Capitol Hill Seattle blog:

Last week, a Department of Neighborhoods community group considered nine new street and parks project for central Seattle and Capitol Hill. Below, you’ll find the three projects that made it through and are being studied for feasibility by the city to be part of some $1.2 million in funding through the Neighborhood Parks and Street Fund. We’ve also included descriptions of all the proposals just in case you want to rally around one of the passed-over ideas next year or you find something to inspire a similar project in your own neighborhood.

….

Project 2014-064 would create street, sidewalk and crossing improvements to E Madison for pedestrian, bicycle and vehicle safety at the site where a man was seriously injured in a collision with a cyclist last year.

Project 2014-021 would add curb bulbs and marked cross walks at the busy and frequently-crossed intersection of 23rd Ave and Boyer.

Project 2014-012 would repair a half-block stretch of “heaving” sidewalk on the north side of E Madison between Boren and McDonald’s.

No projects from Capitol Hill were chosen, mainly because only one Capitol Hill project (2014-052) was submitted.

To see all the proposals and read comments from District Coordinator, Tim Durkan, go here.

Sound Transit posts RFQ for CH TOD site

Sound Transit posted the RFQ for the CH TOD site, to develop its surplus properties as the light rail construction sheds its outside construction sites. (You can read a saved, zipped version here without registering for the ST site.) Besides pushing for the public amenities, the CH Champion also:

* Secured a public meeting co-hosted by ST, where the community will be able to meet proposing teams and bring in the community’s energy and vision.

* Published a concise piece of communication that will provide developers clear initial guidance, and an open door for further discussion.